In the words of one Ese’Eja elder, Mateo Viaeja, “We are the ancient owners of this land because we were the first to come down from the sky. Without the forest, there is no life… and no Ese’Eja.”      Photo by Jon Cox   

In the words of one Ese’Eja elder, Mateo Viaeja, “We are the ancient owners of this land because we were the first to come down from the sky. Without the forest, there is no life… and no Ese’Eja.”   


Photo by Jon Cox

 

 Elisa Shatahua is one of the oldest members of the Palma Real village of the Ese´Eja, and one of the last remaining elders of her people. She holds vital historical knowledge that is key to the survival and historical documentation of the Ese'Eja.    Photo by Andy Bale    

Elisa Shatahua is one of the oldest members of the Palma Real village of the Ese´Eja, and one of the last remaining elders of her people. She holds vital historical knowledge that is key to the survival and historical documentation of the Ese'Eja.  

Photo by Andy Bale 

 

 Treetops emerge from rainforest in the thick morning mist.  This image was taken from the 30-meter canopy tower at the Posada Amazonas lodge.  The lodge is owned by the Ese’Eja community of Infierno and managed in partnership with  Rainforest Expeditions .  Photo by Jon Cox     

Treetops emerge from rainforest in the thick morning mist.  This image was taken from the 30-meter canopy tower at the Posada Amazonas lodge.  The lodge is owned by the Ese’Eja community of Infierno and managed in partnership with Rainforest Expeditions.

Photo by Jon Cox
 

 

 Blue-and-yellow Macaw ( Ara ararauna ) feathers hang in the thatched roof of an Ese’Eja house in the village of Palma Real. Feathers are prized for using as arrow fletching as well as headdresses and ceremonial garments worn by the Ese’Eja.    Photo by Jon Cox       

Blue-and-yellow Macaw (Ara ararauna) feathers hang in the thatched roof of an Ese’Eja house in the village of Palma Real. Feathers are prized for using as arrow fletching as well as headdresses and ceremonial garments worn by the Ese’Eja.  

Photo by Jon Cox 

 

 

 Hunting for peccary was the main focus as I entered the jungle with three members of the Ese´Eja from Palma Real, Peru. However, as hunter-gathers one never turns down what nature provides. Jose Ekiney fishes using a spear fashioned using only a palm from. Within a few seconds he had his first fish and within a few minutes his pockets were full.  Photo by Andy Bale   

Hunting for peccary was the main focus as I entered the jungle with three members of the Ese´Eja from Palma Real, Peru. However, as hunter-gathers one never turns down what nature provides. Jose Ekiney fishes using a spear fashioned using only a palm from. Within a few seconds he had his first fish and within a few minutes his pockets were full.

Photo by Andy Bale

 

  Santiago Pikichehue strips a piece of bark to make a basket strap called a "misa." The Ese'Eja need both hands free to machete their way through the forest while carrying large and heavy objects such as brazil nut pods in baskets strapped to their head.    Photo by Lindsay Yeager 

Santiago Pikichehue strips a piece of bark to make a basket strap called a "misa." The Ese'Eja need both hands free to machete their way through the forest while carrying large and heavy objects such as brazil nut pods in baskets strapped to their head.

Photo by Lindsay Yeager 

 To the Ese’Eja, pink clouds have two distinct meanings. One, the spider monkeys are fat and good for hunting and two, that the next three days will bring “friagens” or a cold snap.  We aren’t sure about the spider monkeys being fat, but the next three days of our cultural mapping expedition went from the 90-degree days to days in the 50’s.     Photo by Jon Cox   

To the Ese’Eja, pink clouds have two distinct meanings. One, the spider monkeys are fat and good for hunting and two, that the next three days will bring “friagens” or a cold snap.  We aren’t sure about the spider monkeys being fat, but the next three days of our cultural mapping expedition went from the 90-degree days to days in the 50’s.  


Photo by Jon Cox